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Find out how your representatives and senators voted on NAPO’s priority legislation by reviewing NAPO’s Legislative Scorecard for the first term of the 117th Congress. Results include all recorded votes that impacted NAPO’s members in Congress during 2021. The Legislative Scorecard includes a description of the votes analyzed and NAPO’s stance on each issue, along […]

The post See how your legislators voted in NAPO’s Mid-Term Legislative Scorecard appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

Find out how your representatives and senators voted on NAPO’s priority legislation by reviewing NAPO’s Legislative Scorecard for the first term of the 117th Congress.

Results include all recorded votes that impacted NAPO’s members in Congress during 2021. The Legislative Scorecard includes a description of the votes analyzed and NAPO’s stance on each issue, along with spreadsheets detailing how Members of Congress voted on each of our priority bills.

The House recorded votes on NAPO’s priority legislation in 2021. However, there were no Senate roll call votes on our priorities in the first term. NAPO had several legislative victories in the Senate that were passed by unanimous consent, which does not record how each individual senator voted. The purpose of the Scorecard is to only track yea/nay votes to attribute support or opposition to senators on NAPO’s priority legislation and analyze their support.

The Mid-Term Report includes NAPO’s Sponsor/Cosponsor spreadsheet to check if your members of Congress have supported pieces of legislation that will impact our members. This provides a fuller picture of individual member’s support for our issues, particularly in the Senate where NAPO has no votes to score.

The post See how your legislators voted in NAPO’s Mid-Term Legislative Scorecard appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

Author: jgomori
Posted: January 21, 2022, 7:05 pm

NAPO priority legislation signed into law in 2021 includes: Protecting America’s First Responders Act, which makes it easier for public safety officers disabled in the line of duty to qualify for the federal Public Safety Officer’s Benefits (PSOB) Program’s disability benefits, ensures beneficiaries receive the highest award amount possible, and makes certain all children of […]

The post Washington Report – Jan. 14, 2022 appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

NAPO priority legislation signed into law in 2021 includes: Protecting America’s First Responders Act, which makes it easier for public safety officers disabled in the line of duty to qualify for the federal Public Safety Officer’s Benefits (PSOB) Program’s disability benefits, ensures beneficiaries receive the highest award amount possible, and makes certain all children of public safety officers disabled or killed in the line of duty are able to benefit from the Public Safety Officers’ Education Assistance Program. It also includes a two-year extension of the COVID presumption for PSOB eligibility for public safety officers who had COVID-19 at the time of death or who are disabled due to COVID-19; COPS Counseling Act implements confidentiality standards for federal law enforcement peer support counseling programs and directs the U.S. Attorney General to report on best practices and professional standards for state and local peer support counseling programs. It ensures all U.S. law enforcement officers have access to confidential peer support programs; and Jaime Zapata and Victor Avila Federal Officers and Employees Protection Act, which applies federal extra territorial jurisdiction to federal murder or attempted murder cases of federal law enforcement officers and that federal law enforcement officers serving abroad receive the same protections as those serving at home.

NAPO priority legislation passed by the Senate in 2021 includes: Better Cybercrime Metrics Act, which would establish standardized metrics for tracking cybercrime helping law enforcement, policy makers, and criminologists better understand the scope and size of cybercrime in the United States. It also would mandate the FBI integrate the new cybercrime metrics into its current reporting systems and databases, making it easier for state and local law enforcement to collect and report on cybercrime in their jurisdictions; and Residential Substance Use Disorder Treatment Act would reauthorize the Residential Substance Use Disorder Treatment program for the next five years at $40 million annually. This program provides funding, training and technical assistance for states and local governments to develop and implement critical substance use disorder treatment programs in state, local, and tribal correctional and detention facilities and to create and maintain community reintegration services for individuals upon release to the community. Check out NAPO’s Legislative Scorecard to discover how your representatives and senators voted on NAPO’s priority legislation during 2021.

On Jan. 5, NAPO obtained a copy of a draft Presidential Executive Order on police reform, which would implement much of Senator Booker’s police reform legislative proposal that NAPO fought so hard to stop last year, and was rejected by Congress. NAPO alerted our members to the draft Order and sent a letter to the White House Domestic Policy Advisor, Ambassador Susan Rice, and the Domestic Policy Council highlighting a few of our biggest concerns and expressing our dismay that NAPO was not at the table for its drafting. We asked to engage in a robust discussion of our concerns, provisions the Administration is considering, including in the final Executive Order, and the Administration’s police reform goals. The Administration stated the document leaked is not the final Order and NAPO is scheduled to meet with the Administration to review where they are with the draft Order; and Please join NAPO’s 33rd Annual Police, Fire, EMS, & Municipal Employee Pension & Benefits Seminar, Feb. 27 – March 1, 2022 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

For more information on these and other legislative issues, please click on the links below.

The post Washington Report – Jan. 14, 2022 appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

Author: jgomori
Posted: January 14, 2022, 7:07 pm

COVID-19 was leading cause of deaths Excerpted from National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund Line-of-duty Law Enforcement fatalities in 2021 increased by 55 percent over 2020 and set a record for the most line-of-duty deaths in a single year, according to data provided by the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF). As of Dec. […]

The post 2021 sets record for deadliest year in Law Enforcement history appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

COVID-19 was leading cause of deaths

Excerpted from National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund

Line-of-duty Law Enforcement fatalities in 2021 increased by 55 percent over 2020 and set a record for the most line-of-duty deaths in a single year, according to data provided by the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF).

As of Dec. 31, 2021, 458 federal, state, county, municipal, military, campus, tribal, and territorial officers died in the line of duty during the past year, according to NLEOMF’s 2021 Law Enforcement Officers Fatalities Report.

“This time of year always reminds us of the sacrifice of law enforcement and the importance of our mission to honor the fallen, tell the story of American law enforcement, and make it safer for those who serve. The year 2021 will go down as the year of the most line-of-duty fatalities since 1930 due to the COVID-19 pandemic and increases in traffic fatalities and firearms ambushes,” said National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund CEO Marcia Ferranto.

In 2020, 295 officers died in the line of duty. Prior to 2021, 1930 held the record for line-of-duty law enforcement fatalities at 312.

Most significant in the 2021 Fatalities Report are the number of officer deaths in the category of “other” causes, which increased 63 percent when compared to 2020’s other causes. Of those 338 deaths in 2021, 301 were officers who died from contracting COVID-19 in the line of duty.

The 37 remaining officers who died from other causes include 25 who perished from other health-related illnesses, such as heart attacks, strokes, and 9/11-related illnesses. There were also four officers who were beaten to death; four officers who drowned; two were stabbed to death; one was killed when their patrol vehicle was swept away by floodwaters; and one was killed in a tornado.

Firearms-related fatalities were the second highest cause of deaths and also were up 38 percent in 2021 over the previous year, claiming the lives of 61 officers compared to 45 officers in 2020. The primary cause of firearms fatalities were officers killed in ambush-style attacks. In 2021, 19 officers were killed in ambush attacks, which is a significant increase over the six ambush attack deaths in 2020.

Traffic-related fatalities followed with 58 deaths in 2021 compared to 42 deaths in 2020, a 38 percent increase. The leading cause of traffic fatalities were “struck by” deaths at 27, which is a 93 percent increase over 2020 “struck by” deaths.

The states with the greatest number of law enforcement line-of-duty fatalities are: Texas with the most officer deaths at 84, followed by Florida with 52 officer deaths; Georgia with 39 officer deaths; California had 24 officer deaths; North Carolina had 21 officer fatalities and Tennessee had the sixth highest number of officer fatalities at 18.

The statistics released are based on preliminary data compiled by the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund and do not represent a final or complete list of individual officers who will be added to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in 2022.

Click on the links below for the complete 2021 End of Year Preliminary Law Enforcement Officers Fatalities Report and NLEOMF’s 2021 Solutions Addendum “Keeping Names Off the Wall”.

The post 2021 sets record for deadliest year in Law Enforcement history appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

Author: jgomori
Posted: January 13, 2022, 7:00 pm

NAPO is urging members to voice opposition to a draft Presidential Executive Order on police reform that is being circulated. The draft Order would implement much of Senator Booker’s police reform legislative proposal that NAPO fought so hard to stop last year and was rejected by Congress. The proposed Executive Order cannot do away with […]

The post NAPO urges members to reject draft Presidential Executive Order on police reform appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

NAPO is urging members to voice opposition to a draft Presidential Executive Order on police reform that is being circulated.

The draft Order would implement much of Senator Booker’s police reform legislative proposal that NAPO fought so hard to stop last year and was rejected by Congress. The proposed Executive Order cannot do away with qualified immunity or expand Section 242 of U.S. Title 18 (criminal prosecution of officers for civil rights violations) as it is an Executive Order, not law. However, it does recommend Congress make significant changes to those long-standing officer protections.

“It is important to shine a light on this draft Order as it is a bad proposal that does nothing to safeguard officers’ rights or safety and we urge that it should not be issued,” wrote Andrea Edmiston, NAPO Director of Governmental Affairs, in a notice to members.

A full summary of the Executive Order is available by clicking the link below. The draft Order was not shared with NAPO, despite repeated requests to the Administration. These screen shots have been uploaded, probably by a concerned federal employee.

Members are urged to voice their objections via social media (@POTUS, @WhiteHouse) or mail to the following addresses:

The Honorable Joseph R. Biden
President of the United States
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20500

Ambassador Susan E. Rice
Director, Domestic Policy Council
Room 469
Eisenhower Executive Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20502

The post NAPO urges members to reject draft Presidential Executive Order on police reform appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

Author: jgomori
Posted: January 7, 2022, 5:35 pm

— By Jennifer Gomori, POJ Editor The POLC extends our deepest condolences to the family of Ken Nash, who represented the Union for nearly 35 years in multiple capacities. Nash passed away Dec. 23, 2021 after a long battle with illness. He will be remembered for his dedication to the labor movement, serving nearly 50 […]

The post Former POLC/GELC Board member, Labor Representative remembered appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

By Jennifer Gomori, POJ Editor

The POLC extends our deepest condolences to the family of Ken Nash, who represented the Union for nearly 35 years in multiple capacities.

Nash passed away Dec. 23, 2021 after a long battle with illness. He will be remembered for his dedication to the labor movement, serving nearly 50 years with labor organizations throughout his law enforcement career.

“Ken’s strong support of the labor movement is inspiring,” said POLC/GELC Executive Director Rob Figurski. “He will be greatly missed by his many friends at the Labor Council.”

Nash retired from the Union as a Labor Representative in 2016. He was first elected to the POLC/GELC Executive Committee while working as a Hazel Park Patrolman. He served as Chair and Vice Chair of the Committee and chaired the POLC Grievance Review Committee for nine years.

Nash represented Hazel Park Patrolmen as the Local Union President. He served as President of AFSCME local and pension trustee for the City of Hazel Park Retirement System, representing the Police and retirees. He retired from Hazel Park PD as a Sergeant after 27-1/2 years of service in January 1995. In December 1995, he began his second career as a POLC/GELC Labor Representative.

Nash will forever be a part of POLC’s history. His signature is on the Union’s original articles of incorporation with the state.

Nash will lie in state at Wujek Calcaterra Funeral Home, 54880 Van Dyke Ave. (at 25 Mile Rd.), Shelby Township, MI, 48316, with visitation 4-9 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 28 and 1-9 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 29 with Rosary at 6 p.m. His funeral is 11 a.m. Dec. 30.

Click here for more information on the services and Nash’s obituary.

The post Former POLC/GELC Board member, Labor Representative remembered appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

Author: jgomori
Posted: December 24, 2021, 6:30 pm

Lawmakers completed passage of a $1.484 billion supplemental appropriations bill containing $1 billion General Fund for the state to use to incentivize companies to choose Michigan for locating large economic development projects. It was a dramatic conclusion to the Legislature’s voting sessions for 2021. Aside from non-voting sessions, the Legislature has concluded all business until […]

The post Karoub Report – December 2021 appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

Lawmakers completed passage of a $1.484 billion supplemental appropriations bill containing $1 billion General Fund for the state to use to incentivize companies to choose Michigan for locating large economic development projects. It was a dramatic conclusion to the Legislature’s voting sessions for 2021. Aside from non-voting sessions, the Legislature has concluded all business until it reconvenes Jan. 12, 2022. Passing both chambers was SB 85, which also contains an additional $484 million gross ($75 million General Fund). This would provide $409 million federal funding in aid for businesses impacted by the coronavirus pandemic and $75 million General Fund to fund raising the floor on the personal property tax exemption; An $842.6M supplemental appropriations bill was heading to the Governor’s desk after a 12-hour day in the House and Senate on Tuesday. That bill would fund COVID-19 testing, mental health services and much more; HB 4398, which was adopted earlier that morning by a conference committee, passed the House 94-9 and the Senate 35-1; A COVID supplemental also passed the House. HB 5523, sponsored by Rep. Julie Calley (R-Portland), passed by a 98-4 vote. Solely Republicans voted against the bill: Steve Johnson of Wayland, Steve Carra of Three Rivers, John Reilly of Oakland Township and Matt Maddock of Milford. The appropriations bill was sheared down some from its initial $1.2 billion amount due to funding dedicated to epidemiology and lab capacity school safety being halved from $300 million to $150 million. That remaining money, the other $150 million, was added into the yearend supplemental to expedite getting funds out the door; The Department of Insurance and Financial Services expects the $400 auto insurance refunds slated to go out to drivers in the state to be issued by May 9, 2022.  The DIFS bulletin and website lay out the timeline and requirements for insurers as well as inform drivers to when and how they will get the refunds. The Governor and the Michigan Catastrophic Claims Association recently announced the refunds would be $400 per vehicle; The state’s minimum wage rate will increase from $9.65 to $9.87 on Jan. 1, 2022; A bill to lower personal and corporate income tax rates was introduced by Sen. Aric Nesbitt (R-Lawton). Citing the coronavirus pandemic and the rise in inflation as a result of the federal response to the pandemic’s economic fallout, SB 768 would lower the personal and corporate income tax rates to 3.9 percent, effective tax years beginning Jan. 1, 2022. The current state personal income tax rate is 4.25 percent and for the state corporate income tax rate it is 6 percent.

For more details on these legislative updates, please click on the December 2021 Karoub Report below.

The post Karoub Report – December 2021 appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

Author: jgomori
Posted: December 17, 2021, 9:23 pm

There is still time to nominate fellow officers for a TOP COPS Award®!  The deadline for nominations is Jan. 11, 2022. Click on the link below for the nomination form. Selection for an award is based on involvement in a specific incident or case wherein an officer(s) has gone above and beyond the call of […]

The post Washington Report – Dec. 17, 2021 appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

There is still time to nominate fellow officers for a TOP COPS Award®!  The deadline for nominations is Jan. 11, 2022. Click on the link below for the nomination form. Selection for an award is based on involvement in a specific incident or case wherein an officer(s) has gone above and beyond the call of duty; Registration is still open for NAPO’s 33rd Annual Police, Fire, EMS, & Municipal Employee Pension & Benefits Seminar, however, the event has been postponed until Feb. 27 to March 1, 2022 in Las Vegas, Nevada due to COVID-19; Learn from industry experts the latest information on pensions and benefits; Under the House-passed bill, the cap on SALT deductions would be lifted from $10,000 to $80,000, retroactive to the beginning of 2021 and through 2030. Many of the Democrat members of Congress we have been working with to repeal the SALT cap stated they would not support the Build Back Better Act without a compromise on the SALT cap. Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and Senator Bob Menendez (D-NJ) are still negotiating their own compromise on the SALT cap, which would keep the $10,000 cap in place for households making over $400-550,000 per year, exempting households making less than that threshold from the cap; Congress punted on dealing with Fiscal Year 2022 Appropriations by passing another continuing resolution through Feb. 18, 2022, funding the federal government and its programs at FY 2021 funding levels; NAPO’s updated “Sponsor/Cosponsor” spreadsheet and the latest “Legislative Positions” document are available on NAPO’s website; To honor your service and show appreciation for your dedication, Citizen Watch America would like to extend a special offer to all NAPO Members this Holiday Season. In addition to the Citizen Thin Blue Line watch offer, they are providing a 15% discount code that can be used on the Citizen website for all watches (Thin Blue Line excluded). Visit www.Citizenwatch.com and to use the code: FIRST21.

For more on these and other important law enforcement legislative initiatives, please click on the Dec. 17, 2021 Washington Report and related links below.

The post Washington Report – Dec. 17, 2021 appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

Author: jgomori
Posted: December 17, 2021, 8:34 pm

New three-year agreement expires June 30, 2024. Wages: 3% effective July 1, 2021. 3% effective July 1, 2022. 3% effective July 1, 2023. Health Care: Optical insurance increased by $50 from $300 to $350 for Employees and $280 to $330 per dependent. Bargaining Team: Sue Comben and Vilma Mazi aided by GELC Labor Representative Jim […]

The post Contract: City of Wixom Clerical Employees appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

  • New three-year agreement expires June 30, 2024.
  • Wages:
    3% effective July 1, 2021.
    3% effective July 1, 2022.
    3% effective July 1, 2023.
  • Health Care: Optical insurance increased by $50 from $300 to $350 for Employees and $280 to $330 per dependent.
  • Bargaining Team: Sue Comben and Vilma Mazi aided by GELC Labor Representative Jim Stachowski.

The post Contract: City of Wixom Clerical Employees appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

Author: jgomori
Posted: December 17, 2021, 4:44 pm

New three-year agreement expires June 30, 2024. Wages: 6% effective July 1, 2021. 3% effective July 1, 2022. 2% effective July 1, 2023. Fringe Benefits: Benefit Time may now be used in half hour increments. New Hires receive 16 hours of Vacation and 16 hours of Sick Time Pay on their date of hire. Longevity […]

The post Contract: City of Wayland Supervisory Unit appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

  • New three-year agreement expires June 30, 2024.
  • Wages:
    6% effective July 1, 2021.
    3% effective July 1, 2022.
    2% effective July 1, 2023.
  • Fringe Benefits: Benefit Time may now be used in half hour increments. New Hires receive 16 hours of Vacation and 16 hours of Sick Time Pay on their date of hire. Longevity of $100 per year will be paid out every 3 years instead of every 5 years. Travel and mileage reimbursement language was added. Previously, there was no reimbursement language. Tuition reimbursement increased from $4,000 to $4,500 per year and will increase $100 more each year of the contract.
  • Retirement: MERS DB bridged down from a 2.5 multiplier to a 2.0 multiplier. Employer contributes 3% to all Employees MERS 457 accounts. Employer also contributes up to an additional 3% match in the 457 accounts.
  • Bargaining Team: Coleman Lutz and Ann Clausen aided by GELC Labor Representative David Thomas.

The post Contract: City of Wayland Supervisory Unit appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

Author: jgomori
Posted: December 17, 2021, 4:39 pm

By Jennifer Gomori, POJ Editor The breaking point for St. Clair County Corrections Officers came when their former Union’s international group began throwing their support behind anti-police organizations. That’s when many of the group’s 110-members stopped paying dues and started looking for other representation. Police Officers Labor Council (POLC) fit the bill, providing law enforcement centered […]

The post St. Clair County Corrections chooses POLC for strength in numbers appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

By Jennifer Gomori, POJ Editor

The breaking point for St. Clair County Corrections Officers came when their former Union’s international group began throwing their support behind anti-police organizations. That’s when many of the group’s 110-members stopped paying dues and started looking for other representation. Police Officers Labor Council (POLC) fit the bill, providing law enforcement centered services.

St. Clair County Corrections Officers voted to join POLC in August after being represented by Teamsters Local 214 for about six years.

“It was in the last year they started supporting some anti-policing groups – not the locals, the international group,” said Justin Wilton, St. Clair County Corrections Officers Local Union Vice President. “We were looking for someone that just represented law enforcement. We provided a few (Union) options for our members and we had a vote and this is the direction our group wanted to go.”

With their existing contract expiring Dec. 31, 2021, the POLC didn’t waste any time preparing to negotiate their new agreement. Issues St. Clair County Corrections Officers would like to address include pay raises, retirement, and some safety concerns.

“One thing we’re going to try to change is retirement health care for those who have 25 (years) and out,” Wilton said of Employees with defined benefit plans. “The County says you have to be at least 50 (years old) to receive full retirement health care. We have a few people who will get to 25 years (of service) before age 50, so they won’t be able to retire and draw retiree health care.”

Bringing in qualified new staff to the department has been a problem the Corrections Officers would like to resolve through improved benefits. “We are trying to increase the County match for the defined contribution plan to make the profession more attractive to younger generations,” Wilton said.

The group’s experience with POLC thus far has been positive. He described the Union as “very organized” with “easy communication.” “Our Rep has been easy to get a hold of,” Wilton said in September. “We’ll see where it goes. We will start negotiations pretty quick.”

One thing they know for certain is the POLC has the best interests of law enforcement at heart and the experience necessary to properly represent St. Clair County Corrections Officers.

The post St. Clair County Corrections chooses POLC for strength in numbers appeared first on Police Officers Labor Council.

Author: jgomori
Posted: December 17, 2021, 4:36 pm

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POLC INFORMATION
Police Officers Labor Council
Union Rep Duane Smith
667 East Big Beaver Rd. Suite 205 Troy, Michigan 48083
Phone#248.524.3200